A brief analysis of “The Banking Concept of Education”


Freire believed that education held the best hope for the promotion of social . Freire calls this the “banking concept of education” where so-called learning . 74 Freire quotes Hegel: “True solidarity with the oppressed means fighting at their .

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Steph and Jen discuss Freire's essay on the Banking Concept of Education

Reproducing Students with the Banking Concept of Education

The banking concept of education has been a popular form of teaching for many years. The concept requires students to copy and memorize large amounts of notes and information, given by the teacher. The teacher will rarely comment on the information that is given but will require the students to observe the data and later on be tested upon it. Personally the banking concept of education is not a sufficient way of learning for me. Memorizing data without discussing its true meaning is a handicap to my education more than a benefit. If I am unable to hold a discussion on the information it makes it difficult to understand the concepts behind the data, and therefore interrupting my ability to grow as a student. Students become no more that "receptacles" when following this concept. It also hinders their ability to think outside of the data and try to conclude the information for themselves. It is not a beneficial way of education if a student is incapable of analyzing the information on their own to help better understand the data that is given to them.

Part One: Freire's Banking Concept of Education

Freires dramatic tone is most likely his strongest rhetorical strategy, as it catches the attention of his audience in a unique manner. It achieves its purpose by inspiring urgent thought regarding the banking concept of education, and it’s drastic results. This tone is the result of Freires dramatic personal experiences from his work with students who have suffered the consequences of the banking concept, and this allows the readers a personal connection through emotion. He speaks with a burning desire to redeem students from the silent oppressor of the banking education system. Without this tone, the article would lack passion, sympathy, intrigue, and inspiration. Most importantly it would not present its deeply controversial message that puts traditional patterns of educational methods into deep scrutiny, and presents a new hope for the system and the individuals within it.

 The Banking Concept of Education
In the banking concept of education, knowledge is a gift bestowed by thosewho consider themselves knowledgeable upon those whom they consider to knownothing. Projecting an absolute ignorance onto others, a characteristic of theideology of oppression, negates education and knowledge as processes ofinquiry. The teacher presents himself to his students as their necessaryopposite; by considering their ignorance absolute, he justifies his ownexistence. The students, alienated like the slave in the Hegelian dialectic,accept their ignorance as justifying the teacher’s existence—but, unlike theslave, they never discover that they educate the teacher. Indeed, the interests of the oppressors lie in "changing theconsciousness of the oppressed, not the situation which oppresses them,"for the more the oppressed can be led to adapt to that situation, the more easilythey can be dominated. To achieve this end, the oppressors use the bankingconcept of education in conjunction with a paternalistic social actionapparatus, within which the oppressed receive the euphemistic title of"welfare recipients." They are treated as individual cases, asmarginal men who deviate from the general configuration of a "good,organized, and just" society. The oppressed are regarded as the pathologyof the healthy society, which must therefore adjust these "incompetent andlazy" folk to its own patterns by changing their mentality. Thesemarginals need to be "integrated," "incorporated" into thehealthy society that they have "forsaken." It is not surprising that the banking concept of educationregards men as adaptable, manageable beings. The more students work at storingthe deposits entrusted to them, the less they develop the criticalconsciousness which would result from their intervention in the world astransformers of that world. The more completely they accept the passive roleimposed on them, the more they tend simply to adapt to the world as it is andto the fragmented view of reality deposited in them. In the banking concept of education, knowledge is a gift bestowed by those who consider themselves knowledgeable upon those whom they consider to know nothing. Projecting an absolute ignorance onto others, a characteristic of the ideology of oppression, negates education and knowledge as processes of inquiry. The teacher presents himself to his students as their necessary opposite; by considering their ignorance absolute, he justifies his own existence. The students, alienated like the slave in the Hegelian dialectic, accept their ignorance as justifying the teachers existence -- but unlike the slave, they never discover that they educate the teacher.
banking concept of education had been used in my life. The case which I will be

FREE Essay on "The Banking Concept of Education"


One of education's primary missions for Aristotle, perhaps its most important, . for his attack on what he called the "banking concept of education," in which the .

Although there are many downfalls to the banking concept of education,

The Banking Concept of Education - Blogs@VT

Paragraph 33: This paragraph talks about the differences of the banking concept of education and the problem-prosing education. For example, this paragraph states that the problem-posing method is always “cognitive.”

Paragraph 24: This paragraph talks about how oppression and the banking concept of education is necrophilic.

Banking Concept of Education John Smyth

Oppression --overwhelming control -- is necrophilic; it is nourished by love of death, not life. The banking concept of education, which serves the interests of oppression, is also necrophilic. Based on a mechanistic, static, naturalistic, spatialized view of consciousness, it transforms students into receiving objects. It attempts to control thinking and action, leads women and men to adjust to the world, and inhibits their creative power.