The Moika Palace or Yusupov Palace in St. Petersburg

Almost 30 halls with dazzling interiors, the best furnishings of different epochs, and allure of the pre-revolutionary bourgeoisie; all this is the gorgeous Moika Palace (also known as Yusupov Palace) in Saint-Petersburg, Russia.

Moika Palace, Saint Petersburg, of The Princes Yusupov

The beauty of the Moika Palace, the primary home of the Youssoupoff family.

Moika Palace - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Moika Palace or Yusupov Palace (: , literally the Palace of the Yusupovs on the Moika) was once the primary residence in , of the . The building was the site of 's murder in the early morning of December 17, 1916.

Moika Palace - Life Ball 2015 Style Bible.

The exact events surrounding Rasputin's death are still in dispute. What seems clear is that on 30 December [ 17 December] 1916, 1916 Felix Yusupov, along with and invited to the Moika Palace. He took Rasputin to a small but lavishly furnished cellar room of the palace. There he served Rasputin red wine. When Rasputin was affected, Yusupov retrieved a revolver and shot Rasputin from the side. Taking him for dead, Yusupov went upstairs to where the other conspirators waited in a ground floor study/drawing room. Rasputin succeeded in fleeing through a side door into a gated courtyard which opened onto the street outside. Purishkevich then shot Rasputin in the back, on the doorstep. The body was taken inside and a third bullet fired at close range, entered his forehead. The conspirators wrapped Rasputin in a broadcloth, drove outside the city and threw the body into the .

Bedroom of Princess Irina Alexandrovna of Russia, Moika Palace, Russia
The Moika Palace or Yusupov Palace was once the primary residence of the House of Yusupov. The building was the site of Grigori Rasputin"s murder in 1916. The palace was first built around 1770 by the French architect Jean-Baptiste Vallin de la Mothe. Over the years numerous well-known architects worked on the palace, and it is known for the hodgepodge of architectural styles. A. Mikhailov reconstructed the building in 1830-s when the Yusupov’s became owners of this palace . This time the modern appearance of the palace was formed.Moika Palace was once the primary residence in St. Petersburg, Russia of the House of Yusupov. The building was the site of Grigori Rasputin's murder in the ...The Moika Palace was the residence of the aristocrat Prince in during the early . In , the Prince and his co-conspirators Grand Duke and the Russian mystic . (: )Being built in 1770 this palace, wonderful and the same time tragic (a basement of the building was the place of Grigori Rasputin’s murder in 1916), now attracts a lot of tourists from all across the world. And, if you can’t visit it personally, we suggest to take a virtual trip around the Moika Palace. Here are 65 beautiful photos from inside the house.
Name: Yusupov Palace or Moika PalaceLocation: Saint PetersburgCountry: Russia

The Moika Palace | Rasputin, Ripples to Revolution

Almost 30 halls with dazzling interiors, the best furnishings of different epochs, and allure of the pre-revolutionary bourgeoisie; all this is the gorgeous Moika Palace (also known as Yusupov Palace) in Saint-Petersburg, Russia.

Moika Palace

The Moika Palace, St. Petersburg | opulence | Pinterest

Almost 30 halls with dazzling interiors, the best furnishings of different epochs, and allure of the pre-revolutionary bourgeoisie; all this is the gorgeous Moika Palace (also known as Yusupov Palace) in Saint-Petersburg, Russia.

Moika Palace

Moika Palace - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia4498

The palace is most famous, however, because of the actions of its last prince Felix Yusupov. He was thought to be even as rich as the tsar. In Russia Yusupov owned 57 palaces, including four in St. Petersburg. The palace on the Moika was the prince’s favorite residence in the capital. The exact events surrounding Rasputin"s death are much in dispute. The story, according to Yusupov, is that on the night of December 16, 1916 he, along with Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich of the House of Romanov, invited Grigori Rasputin to the Moika Palace. Supposedly, they served Rasputin cakes and red wine laced with cyanide — supposedly enough poison to kill five men. Concerned that Rasputin appeared unaffected, Yusupov retrieved a gun and shot Rasputin in the back. Taking him for dead, the party prepared to leave. Yusupov returned a short while later to find Rasputin still alive. He and his conspirators shot Rasputin, at close range, three more times, but Rasputin was still attempting to stand back up and flee. Desperate they clubbed Rasputin in the head repeatedly with an iron bar, wrapped him in a blanket, walked outside and tossed him into the Moika River. His autopsy supposedly found that neither the poison, nor the multiple gunshot wounds, nor the clubbing caused his death — instead he died of hypothermia. Much of the account, from Yusupov, is considered implausible.