Traveling through the dark I found a deer

Traveling through the dark I found a deer
dead on the edge of the Wilson River road.
It is usually best to roll them into the canyon:
that road is narrow; to swerve might make more dead.

Story of William Stafford's poem .Traveling through the Dark'.

Example: “Traveling through the dark I found a deer/  on the  of the Wilson River road” (Stafford).

Traveling Through the Dark by William Stafford






Traveling through the dark though it is day
we find two bodies in the road
unrecognizable and booby-trapped,

quite sure they’re the two kidnapped soldiers
from the checkpoint,
no faces left, the bellies beginning to swell,

what must they have felt and thought
as they were tortured,
were they thinking,

Traveling through the dark though it is day
we find two bodies in the road
and we don’t recognize ourselves.

Traveling through the Dark, Harper & Row, 1962.

Traveling through the dark I found a deer
dead on the edge of the Wilson River road.
It is usually best to roll them into the canyon:
that road is narrow; to swerve might make more dead.

When you do give a reading do you feel a responsibility to read “Traveling through the Dark”
Traveling Through The Dark Analysis William Stafford critical analysis of poem, review school overview. Analysis of the poem. literary terms. Definition terms. Why did he use? short summary describing. Traveling Through The Dark Analysis William Stafford Characters archetypes. Sparknotes bookrags the meaning summary overview critique of explanation pinkmonkey. Quick fast explanatory summary. pinkmonkey free cliffnotes cliffnotes ebook pdf doc file essay summary literary terms analysis professional definition summary synopsis sinopsis interpretation critique Traveling Through The Dark Analysis William Stafford itunes audio book mp4 mp3 mit ocw Online Education homework forum helpThe poem by William Stafford, “Traveling Through the Dark” presents readers with an uncomfortable and rather grim instance of the intersection of the natural world and that of man. Technology, in this case cars and the man-made road, are seen as something invasive and harmful in this poem. In order to convey the meaning of the poem “Traveling Through the Dark” by William Stafford uses a conversational style to communicate the theme in the poem of the role of technology in modern life and, more importantly, the theme of man versus nature becomes apparent. Traveling through the dark I found a deer
dead on the edge of the Wilson River road.
It is usually best to roll them into the canyon:
that road is narrow; to swerve might make more dead.

By glow of the tail-light I stumbled back of the car
and stood by the heap, a doe, a recent killing;
she had stiffened already, almost cold.
I dragged her off; she was large in the belly.

My fingers touching her side brought me the reason--
her side was warm; her fawn lay there waiting,
alive, still, never to be born.
Beside that mountain road I hesitated.

The car aimed ahead its lowered parking lights;
under the hood purred the steady engine.
I stood in the glare of the warm exhaust turning red;
around our group I could hear the wilderness listen.

I thought hard for us all--my only swerving--,
then pushed her over the edge into the river.
"Traveling through the Dark" recalls the Emotive Imagination through its useof personifications and images. The images, however, are not surreal, and the poem itselfremains consistently an objective narration. Stafford structures the poem upon fourfour-line stanzas and a concluding couplet. Irregular in meter, the poem employs noregular rhyme scheme--only occasional half-rhymes: "road / dead," "canyon /reason," "engine / listen." In its formal aspects, the poem ischaracterized by its economy of statement. Its easy colloquialism camouflages to a degreethis organization . As Charles F. Greiner has pointed out, the use of a single word can besignificant. The unborn fawn is described as "alive, still, never to be born."The word "still" sustains meanings on at least three levels: (1) still as alive; (2) still as indeed, so silent he hears "the wildernesslisten"; (3) still as "stillborn," an inevitable association with theappearance of both "still" and "born" within the same phrase.
“Traveling through the Dark,” says a representative from Missouri. The poem begins:

Traveling through the Dark - Shmoop

While travelling through the dark, the narrator finds a dead deer on the edge of the Wilson river road. He very clearly rationalizes that the best way is to push it into the river as the road is narrow, it may cause more accident. With the help of the light of the tail-light of the car, he reached the heap and found that it was a recent killing of the doe. She was already stiffened so he started dragging her off. But he found that she was pregnant and the fawn was there still and alive waiting to be born. He was suddenly stopped in his physical action and the mental action began. When he touched the side he came up with a reason. He stood there thinking about the baby. The engine inside the car was making a purr sound. He was turned red in the glare of the warm exhaust. He couldn’t decide what to do at the moment. He felt it very hard to bring out any good judgment. Meanwhile, he pushed her in the river. Eventually he did what he said in the beginning. He thought it the only alternative finally stood in front of him.

Traveling through the dark.

Complete summary of William Stafford's Traveling Through the Dark

In "Traveling Through the Dark," by Stafford, the speaker relates to the deer in a personal way. The speaker feels a connection between the deer and himself because he has a great concern for animals. The speaker wants to do the right thing for the deer and is angry that mankind can be so careless with animals by stating, "to swerve might...

Traveling through the Dark Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory

"Travelingthrough the Dark" is a poem written in free verse. It doesn'tfollow any pattern of rhyme or meter. However, once in a while,an alliteration or